Industrial Buildings: From Private Hands to Institutional Buyers

Industrial Buildings: From Private Hands to Institutional Buyers

One of the longest running trends in industrial real estate is the shift of ownership from private hands to institutions. Traditionally, insurance companies, pension funds, and real estate investment trusts (REITs) would purchase new developments and industrial parks after they had been leased and stabilized. It served as both a guaranteed exit for entrepreneurial developers as well as the way investors would acquire property to match long term obligations.
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Geodata, MappSnap and Industrial Real Estate

Geodata, MappSnap and Industrial Real Estate

Geodata is widely used in many commercial internet applications like Yelp, Google Maps, Twitter, Foursquare and Factual. Many of these web services match your phone’s location to their own mapping programs. In most cases location data is an aid to sell goods and services. I use the same relationship between point data and the connected internet to find more real estate deals using MappSnap.


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A Backwater No Longer

A Backwater No Longer

As industrial moves from being an operations decision to a financial product, it’s no longer a sleepy backwater of the investment world. Institutional Capital has permanently changed markets from locally owned and operated to globally owned and tenanted. It’s a 40-year trend beginning with the first wave of Japanese corporations and now exploding with institutional capital since the 2008 Financial Crisis. The influence of institutional capital makes it a different business. The driver is no longer business operations but financialization.
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Four Current Forces of the Industrial Real Estate Business

Four Current Forces of the Industrial Real Estate Business

The current robustness in industrial real estate markets obscures many forces that can balance and protect your investment and location decisions. Technology, Monetary Policy, Political Risk, and Space Transparency are important factors that provide support during good times and bad.
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European Opportunities for U.S Occupiers and Investors

European Opportunities for U.S Occupiers and Investors

I just returned from the SIOR European Conference in Warsaw, Poland. It’s my third visit to Europe recently and the most persistent trend is the expansion of big warehouse development. It’s leading to opportunities for U.S. occupiers and investors mainly due to the strength of the dollar.
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Industrial Building Portfolios – In Heavy Demand

Industrial Building Portfolios – In Heavy Demand

Industrial Building Portfolios, $50MM and greater, are where the action is today. Institutional investors need scale and the only place to find it, as far as industrial, is in the portfolios of National Operating Companies and Private Partnerships. Institutional Investors stand between the real estate and fixed obligations to satisfy pension, insurance, and retirement plans. It’s major financial plumbing and as the obligations grow so does the need for product. Roll ups, a familiar consolidation vehicle in corporate America, is now the preferred way for large real estate investors to buy. Unknown to many, national industrial building ownership is consolidating and almost all local developers/investors sell into these relatively few pools as a final exit.
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Race for Space – The New Dynamism

Race for Space – The New Dynamism

Dynamic pricing is becoming a greater influence on space leasing and building sales. By dynamism, I mean fluctuating rents separate from conventional underwriting. A “spot market” is emerging to satisfy demand for smaller, flexible, and elastic spaces. Many examples include Truck Yards, Warehouse Sharing, Creative, Cannabis, and other categories of sub-space where “street rents” are disconnected from contract rents. WeWork and Amazon are two primary examples that contract with the Landlord at one rent, and lease out space bits at higher rents. Public Warehouses, Self-Storage, Swap Meets, Studios and Truck Yards operate along the same model by collecting additional rent by offering “alternative occupancies” with varying degrees of added services. The revolution is any building can be pieced out especially with easily acquired technology that can create “smart” buildings for automation, surveillance, and access.
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